.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • There has been a collection of Mount Vernon residents over the years that have worked diligently to improve and better the local community. They have created organizations, and over time, even changed lives.

    Phyllis Alspaugh is one of those people.

    Over the last 40 years, this Mount Vernon resident has worked and volunteered alongside others to implement staple outreach programs like the River Bend Food Pantry, the homeless shelter, the Neighbor to Neighbor program and more.

  • By Harold Morgan

    The Evansville Press interviewed William Gonnerman and his daughter, Lena Gonnerman, in January 1938 about the Keck-Gonnerman Plant in Mount Vernon. The following article is paraphrased from that report:


    The Keck-Gonnerman Automobile

  • Andrea Schirmer never considered herself an artist before she attended the Adult Drawing and Watercolor classes at the Alexandrian Public Library.

    “I used to say that I couldn’t even draw a stick figure,” the retired hair stylist said.

    Now, about three years later, Schirmer takes pride in her work, which has steadily improved over time.

  • The Riverbend Market returned May 22 to the Mount Vernon riverfront with more vendors and participants than ever before.

    It is an upwards trend that market chairperson and participating business owner Rachel Rainey would like to see continue.

    “We’ve gotten a great response from vendors, and we’re continuing to get the word out about the market to the community,” she said. “We want to continue making this something everyone in town can enjoy.”

  • Newlyweds Angie and Harold Green wanted to make their wedding day a home run success - literally.

    On May 28, the Mount Vernon couple and die-hard St. Louis Cardinals fans proclaimed their “I do’s” atop home plate at Busch Stadium. From the invitations to the cake, the Greens hit it out of the park with their unique baseball theme, complete with Cracker Jack guest souvenirs and home plate guestbook.

  • Mount Vernon business owner Tim Jones stood on the tarmac of the bustling Orange County International Airport in California two weeks ago with 35 other men. Massive jets thundered and maneuvered around the nearby landing strips.

    But Jones and the others were on the runway for a more vintage aircraft.

    For one day, Jones and other professional auto body detailers from around the country gathered to buff and polish two World War II fighter planes.

  • Mount Vernon business owner Tim Jones stood on the tarmac of the bustling Orange County International Airport in California two weeks ago with 35 other men. Massive jets thundered and maneuvered around the nearby landing strips.

    But Jones and the others were on the runway for a more vintage aircraft.

    For one day, Jones and other professional auto body detailers from around the country gathered to buff and polish two World War II fighter planes.

  • Abbey Oden had never written much poetry prior to her creative writing class last year at the University of Southern Indiana.

    That’s why the Mount Vernon High School graduate was a little surprised to learn that three of her poems had been selected to appear in FishHook, USI’s annual student humanities publication.

    “I was really excited when I first found out,” she said. “I actually didn’t tell anyone I was submitting my work, so I was excited to tell my family and friends.” 

  • Mount Vernon’s Relay For Life committee is making changes to this year’s event in hopes of increasing community interest and involvement.

    The annual American Cancer Society fundraiser, traditionally held at the high school, will make Riverbend Park its 2017 home this weekend. And if the May 13 date seems earlier than last year, that’s because it is. Changes to the date and location are an attempt to make Relay For Life more visible in the community and encourage student participation.

  • Visitors will soon see a beautiful, blooming addition to Marrs Community Park, thanks to a special Earth Day project carried out by local Boy Scouts.

    The rainy Saturday morning workday helped the young men earn their conservation badges, and in return, they helped plant 12 varieties of wildflowers in a special one-acre section of the park.

    “They were a hard working group,” said Marrs Township Trustee Christina Seifert. “We were happy to have them lend a hand.”

  • The McKim’s One Day Meat Sale is one of the busiest days of the year for the small Mount Vernon grocery store, and long-time employee Rick Englebright can confirm that. He spent much of that Thursday running to the back, stocking shelves and helping customers find what they needed.

    He was also stopped by customers who didn’t need anything from Englebright, except a moment of his time.

  • Hundreds of students have passed through Dan Guthrie’s office over the last 29 years. They’ve visited the Mount Vernon High School guidance counselor for numerous reasons, positive and painful. As the faces came and went, Guthrie said he always hoped that the work he did had a positive impact on Mount Vernon students.

    “I think that’s what anyone in a helping profession hopes for,” he said. “You hope you are making a difference and helping people when they need it most.”

  • This week our local meteorologist, Hans Schmitz, tackles storms and sunsets. One question relates to hurricanes and hurricane season, which officially begins June 1.  The second question relates to sunsets, which become potentially more colorful when temperatures rise.


    What is the difference between a cyclone and a hurricane?

  • Father Jim Sauer is the outgoing, friendly pastor at St. Matthew Catholic Church in Mount Vernon, and last month, he celebrated 40 years in the priesthood.

    It’s a journey that has taken the man of the cloth across the state and beyond, but Sauer remains lighthearted and humble about the special milestone.

    “Some days it feels like yesterday, and other times it feels like 100 years,” he said. “It’s like a marriage in that way.”

  • Julie Turner’s love of flowers began many years ago, but it wasn’t until recently that the Mount Vernon resident realized how rare her favorite blooms were.

    The long-time gardener has dedicated a total of five acres of land on her family farm to growing flowers, particularly daffodils. They have been Turner’s favorite flower since she was a girl, but until she attended the World Daffodil Expo in St. Louis last year, she didn’t know that she owned several uncommon and sought after varieties of the plant.

  • Residents had their last opportunity to contribute a small piece of history to Mount Vernon’s bicentennial time capsule Saturday.

    Letters, rectangular signs and other memorabilia filled three folding tables at the Fire and Safety Training Room where the capsule’s “public sealing” took place. Bicentennial Committee President Becky Higgins said the open house event was a chance for residents to see the capsule’s contents, but noted that the object won’t truly be sealed for several more months.

  • Mary Buchanan is a member of an increasingly rare demographic, what the working class respectfully refers to as “a lifer.” For over 43 years, Buchanan has remained loyal to a single employer, the MSD of Mount Vernon, where she currently serves as Treasurer and Secretary to the Superintendent.

    At the last school board meeting, the members approved her September retirement request – though not without some hesitation.

  • The six teenagers traded jokes with one another and adjusted their gear absentmindedly as the smell of hickory smoke wafted through the open window.

    A crackle escaped from behind the steel door, and a Black Township firefighter soon emerged.

    The group of once giggly high schoolers quickly drew quiet and attentive. Soon, it would be their turn to put out the fire quietly kindling in Room One.

  • This week, we ask our meteorologist Hans Schmitz some questions about Southern Indiana’s unusual weather.

    Why is Southern Indiana so humid in the summer?

  • Jake McGennis is a lifelong Posey County resident. He’s been involved in agriculture since before he could walk, so his recent partnership with Curran Miller as a consultant just made sense.

    “I’ve been involved with ag for many years. They were looking for someone with a farming background. This is an avenue I’ve been interested in, so it just kind of fell into place,” said McGennis.