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Today's Features

  • Nestled on top of a rolling hill in the Posey County countryside is a small chapel with a growing reputation.

    The Caborn Chapel has hosted over 200 weddings in the last four years, with upcoming dates booked as far out as 2019. Its owner, Scott Hollowman, said the chapel’s charm and rural location are appealing to many couples preparing to tie the knot.

  • The roadside produce stand is an Indiana symbol that summer has officially arrived. In Mount Vernon, Dave Meurer’s farmers’ stand has served as a harbinger of the warm season for more than 30 years.

    From June until about Labor Day, Meurer – a former Mount Vernon Junior High School math teacher – sells locally grown fruits and vegetables from his canvas-covered hut. His reputation has grown so much over the years that Meurer’s steady stream of customers now includes visitors who travel as far as 45 minutes to buy his wares.

  • There is something haunting about New Harmony. Its small town charm and historic architecture have attracted visitors for decades, but paranormal investigator Joni Mayhan thinks there’s something more than that. She believes the community’s rich history has contributed to an active afterlife for ghosts and spirits.

    “I felt the energy present in the town almost right away,” said Mayhan, a Posey County native who returned to the area last year. “I feel like everything happens for a reason, and that I was meant to live in New Harmony.”

  • If the woods in Spencer County, Indiana could talk, they may tell tales of a boy who grew to be a young man with a thirst for knowledge and resolve like no other.

    Abraham Lincoln traversed these woods and the Lincoln Amphitheatre now sits in that location.

    ‘Young Abe Lincoln,’ the play that was made famous in the Lincoln Amphitheatre, is back this summer for its 30th anniversary, and the first time in 12 years.

    Matthew Herrmann, a 1999 graduate of Mount Vernon, will be playing teen Abe Lincoln.

  • Dr. Lee’s private practice in Mount Vernon unveiled a new wing of its facility last week that will accommodate an additional general practitioner with strong family ties to the operation.

    Less than two weeks after wrapping up her residency with Deaconess in Evansville, Kathryn Lee-Kalsch joined her brother and father at the Fourth St. office.

  • Dr. Lee’s private practice in Mount Vernon unveiled a new wing of its facility last week that will accommodate an additional general practitioner with strong family ties to the operation.

    Less than two weeks after wrapping up her residency with Deaconess in Evansville, Kathryn Lee-Kalsch joined her brother and father at the Fourth St. office.

  • Beth Foster resigned as the General Manager and Editor of the Mount Vernon Democrat a little over a decade ago, but during her time at the publication, she helped lead the weekly newspaper to two Hoosier State Press Association Blue Ribbon awards as well as two other staff awards from the HSPA.

    Foster cited an experienced, helpful staff and advancements in technology as key factors in the Democrat’s success during this period.

  • The mechanics and affordability of 3D printers have evolved tremendously in the last decade. What was once a rare and costly investment, mostly relegated to laboratories and high tech businesses, is now more accessible to the average person than ever before.

    Mount Vernon resident Chuck Gray purchased his 3D printer at the beginning of June. The city water superintendent is also a Star Wars hobbyist and self-described tinkerer. Gray said his desire to create new things is what motivated him to purchase his new machine.

  • On June 24, a special ceremony was held at the First Presbyterian Church in Mount Vernon to welcome the congregation’s new pastor.

    Andrew Clark, a native of Springfield, Ohio, refers to himself as a “second career pastor.” For over 25 years, he worked in a very different sector as a scientist in an Ohio hospital laboratory.

    There was no “lightening bolt moment” for Clark that made him decide to make such a major career change.

  • Justin Scheller, a Poseyville native, was only five years old when he appeared alongside Tom Hanks and other iconic actors in the classic film, A League of Their Own.

    His recollections of rubbing shoulders with Hollywood celebrities is fuzzy, but Scheller said what he does recall about the cast is positive.

    “As a five-year-old, I didn’t really understand who Tom Hanks was or anything like that,” he explained. “But I do have strong memories of just how nice and kind everyone was to me and my mom during that entire process.”